About Us

Overview

Blockster Labs is the product based startup founded in 2019 by the technocrats behind Ayanworks Technology Pvt Ltd. Since its inception, Blockster labs specializes in emerging technologies such as blockchain and Internet of things (IoT) and others with key functional areas like Data Privacy and Self-Sovereign Identity.

Blockster Labs has been recently focusing on developing CREDEBL, a decentralized identity platform that enables a revolutionary way to manage digital identities. Additionally, we have developed and offered other core SSI components including our user mobile app ADEYA, mediator agent and mobile wallet SDK. We take pride in making two SDKs open source for the SSI community – React Native and Google Flutter SDK.

With a team of motivated, seasoned and techno-functional geeks, Blockster Labs is committed to deliver enterprise grade solutions. Our solutions are designed to deliver value to the customers by building greater customer intimacy, utilizing innovative technology stack and lean development principles. This has helped Blockster Labs to establish a mark in the industry within a short span of time.

Blockster Labs is keeping pace with the dynamically changing technology landscape and developing cutting edge products and solutions to capitalize on succeeding market opportunities.

With the in-depth knowledge in the blockchain space, Blockster Labs knows what it takes to solve problems by being nimble and without overarching the solutions.

Leadership

KiranKalyan Kulkarni
Co- Founder & CEO
Ajay Jadhav
Co- Founder & CTO

Advisory

Ravikant Agrawal
Advisory

Brainiacs

Chirag Sharma
Head Business Development
Ankita Patidar
Tech Lead – Products
Prasad Katkar
Tech Lead – Products
Rinkal Bhojani
Tech Lead – Products
Amit Padmani
Tech Lead – Identity Wallets

Team

Ankita Patidar
Tech Lead – Products
Prasad Katkar
Tech Lead – Products
Rinkal Bhojani
Tech Lead – Products
Amit Padmani
Tech Lead – Identity Wallets
Sachin Chalake
UI/UX Design Engineer

Vision and Mission

Vision

It is essential that all the entities (Issuer, Verifier, Holder) which are part of the Verifiable Credential ecosystem will have their unique decentralized Identifier or DID. DID is aA globally unique persistent identifier that does not require a centralized registration authority. Because it can be generated by anyone and/or are optionally registered cryptographically onto a verifiable data registry such as a DLT/Blockchain or a traditional database.

Mission

A user generates a presentation also called as Proof against the request. This is the data derived from one or more verifiable credentials, issued by one or more issuers. A verifiable presentation is a tamper-evident presentation encoded in such a way that authorship of the data can be trusted after a process of cryptographic verification. Certain types of verifiable presentations might contain data that is amalgamated from, but do not contain, the original verifiable credentials (Zero-Knowledge Proofs). At least one proof mechanism, and the details are necessary to evaluate that proof. There are two classes of proof mechanisms identified by W3C specs: external proofs and embedded proofs.

Vision

It is essential that all the entities (Issuer, Verifier, Holder) which are part of the Verifiable Credential ecosystem will have their unique decentralized Identifier or DID. DID is aA globally unique persistent identifier that does not require a centralized registration authority. Because it can be generated by anyone and/or are optionally registered cryptographically onto a verifiable data registry such as a DLT/Blockchain or a traditional database.

Mission

A user generates a presentation also called as Proof against the request. This is the data derived from one or more verifiable credentials, issued by one or more issuers. A verifiable presentation is a tamper-evident presentation encoded in such a way that authorship of the data can be trusted after a process of cryptographic verification. Certain types of verifiable presentations might contain data that is amalgamated from, but do not contain, the original verifiable credentials (Zero-Knowledge Proofs).

At least one proof mechanism, and the details are necessary to evaluate that proof. There are two classes of proof mechanisms identified by W3C specs: external proofs and embedded proofs.